In the footsteps of pioneers and outlaws

Utah State Route 12 is one of the state’s scenic byways. Near Boulder we were at the highest and coldest point of our journey (2926 m above sealevel and 6 degrees centigrade). The views were magnificent and diverse. First we drove through the winding road across rocky desert and soon we passed the birch wood forests similar to the ones in Finland.

Scenic Byway 12, Utah

We were also following the footsteps of some famous outlaws. Minna had booked a room at the Torrey Schoolhouse. Its Saturday night dances used to have famous visitors. Butch Cassidy is said to have attended the parties. Robbers Roost, the legendary hideout of Butch Cassidy’s and Sundance Kid’s Wild Bunch gang, is also nearby.

On arrival in the evening we had dinner at Cafe Diablo in Torrey. They served Rattlesnake cakes for startes and because we had never tasted a snake before it was an obvious choice for us. We booked a table beforehand but on the same day just to make sure we would get something to eat. It was just 1.4 km from Torrey Schoolhouse to the restaurant so we decided to walk. I know that walking is a bit frowned upon in the USA. Without street lights or sidewalks it can be also a bit dangerous. But mainly it feels really weird when no one else is walking. Some kids actually shouted something at as from a moving vehicle.

Rattlesnake cakes for dinner

The Torrey Schoolhouse had very nice rooms and breakfast was included in the price. As it was run by the owner and her son the breakfast was organised at a set time in the morning for all guests. We had breakfast with a French diplomat couple and a British couple. The French diplomat was very interested in tanks and had even visited the Parola Armour Museum in Hämeenlinna, Finland. It turned out that all guests in our table were either going to the same direction as we were or coming from that direction already. All of us were visiting the same National Parks. We all shared some tips and moved on.

Panorama Point, Capitol Reef National Park Utah

It was a short drive from Torrey to Capitol Reef National Park. We got our first view to the park from Panorama Point and Gooseneck Overlook. Then we drove further towards Capitol Gorge. We didn’t need a four-wheel-drive but a high-clearance vehicle was really necessary here. On the way to Capitol Gorge we saw an uranium mine. Radioactive materials were used for health purposes. Once they found out it’s not good for you the mines were closed.

The main attraction of Capitol Gorge is Pioneer Register. It is a rock wall with engravings of the late 19th century Mormon pioneers. The names and dates were still very clearly visible on the wall.

Next we drove back to Fruita village. The village was an oasis in the middle of the desert. Unfortunately it was not the fruit season. The fruit trees in the village are available for the tourists and they can pick free fruit from them. There are also some Indian petroglyphs in the village. We parked the car and took a hike to the Hickman Bridge before we left. The next leg of the journey would be 238 km from Capitol Reef National Park to Moab, Utah. It is possible to visit two national parks from Moab: Arches and Canyonlands.

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